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 Post Posted: Mon Jan 19, 2009 4:05 pm 
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Location: SoCal
I think this is a good eye opener both for breeders placing puppies and new owners looking for a Lacy. In 2001, these were the top ten reasons people relinquished their dogs to a shelter:

Moving
Landlord issues
Cost of pet maintenance
No time for pet
Inadequate facilities
Too many pets at home
Pet illness
Personal problems
Biting
No home for littermates

As a working dog with a lot of energy and drive, Lacys are especially susceptible to several of these circumstances. If new owners don't honestly assess their lifestyle and breeders don't carefully screen potential buyers, it's the dog that will ultimately suffer. So before you get a Lacy, or before you sell a Lacy to a new owner, carefully consider these questions:

Will you be moving in the future? If so, do you have a plan for moving with your dog?

Do you have the financial resources for routine care as well as emergency medical treatment? This is especially important to consider if your dog will be hunting or working in the field. If your Lacy gets gored by an antler or bite by a snake, what will you do?

Do you have the time for a high energy breed that requires a job? Lacys need daily attention to keep them physically and mentally sound. Additionally, many need challenging work to do, which requires time, training and resources beyond regular exercise. Dogs with seasonal jobs, such as blood tracking, will need extra daily attention when they aren't working.

Do you have the right living situation for a high energy breed that requires a job? Apartments and urban homes are not the ideal setting for a Lacy. A house with a large yard or property in the country makes life much easier. Regardless of where you live, will this type of dog fit in with your neighbors and landlord?

Are you willing to deal with the additional responsibilities of a dog that has been bred for generations to aggressively herd and hunt animals? Herding breeds can be prone to nipping or biting due to their droving instincts. Cur-style hunting breeds are very alert and protective and tend to guard their territory. You must train and work your dog so their drive doesn't warp into behavior issues.

Most importantly, a Lacy will dedicate their life to their master. Are you willing to return the favor? This breed requires a very active owner willing to put a lot of time and energy into their dog. But they'll pay you back with interest.

_________________
"You must be a very small minority no matter who you hang around with. Maybe you should start a magazine, Vegetarian Hog Dogging Monthly, find some like-minded individuals."
- Inspiration for my next project from TBH

True Blue Lacys: http://www.truebluelacys.com
More Lacy Pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/julieanna/sets/72157605027566732/


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 Post Posted: Mon Jan 19, 2009 10:54 pm 
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Posts: 2456
Location: SoCal
And just in case anyone is interested in sharing this with potential owners, a modified version is up on the blog: http://workinglacys.wordpress.com/2009/ ... /#more-207

_________________
"You must be a very small minority no matter who you hang around with. Maybe you should start a magazine, Vegetarian Hog Dogging Monthly, find some like-minded individuals."
- Inspiration for my next project from TBH

True Blue Lacys: http://www.truebluelacys.com
More Lacy Pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/julieanna/sets/72157605027566732/


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 Post Posted: Tue Jan 20, 2009 8:13 am 
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Posts: 1186
Location: San Antonio
Julie, this is great. I have had a dog return on the last litter I had due to a allergy issue the young lady was having.... I think the truth was they couldn't handle this dog. Even though they were out doors people and hike and jogged all the time. The demands of the dog was just too much. I tried to explain how much work they can be. Needless to say as a breeder I was happy to find him a new home and a good friend of all of ours has him and according to my last update from Mike & Mis; Halo is turning out to be a good working dog. I am sure her allergies are all cleared up now to! Too often people want them because they are the State dog, or they are such a pretty blue color. I was told by someone they found these dogs simply by looking up the state symbols.

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Alex & Shannon


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