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 Post Posted: Mon Jul 13, 2009 10:53 pm 
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Kennel cough is the equivalent of the common cold in people. Why your dogs got so sick from it, I dont know. Ben got it, altho the vet didnt say it was kennel cough, he said it was from allergies and him being a hunting dog. It was dry and the pollen was high, so it made sense to me. Then, Lucy started coughing, then Larry. That told me that Ben had something contagious, not allergies and it must have been kennel cough. The dogs never did anything but cough. It didnt bother them, didnt make them sick. I wonder if what your dogs had was truly kennel cough.

I'll post more info tomorrow, its late and I have been in town all day.

Betty

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 Post Posted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 2:26 pm 
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From /www.caberfeidh.com/Revax.htm

Kennel Cough
The kennel cough complex (bordatella, parainfluenza, CAV-1) is a set of treatable diseases similar to a cold. A normal, healthy animal shouldn't become seriously ill with any of them. Immunity to CAV-2 (infectious hepatitis) gives cross protection to CAV-1, and the CAV-2 vaccine provides a similar duration of immunity to parvo and distemper (many years, probably lifelong). The bordatella vaccine is not long-lasting, since both natural and vaccine bacterial immunity are always temporary, and I believe, considering how often you have to repeat it, the risk mounts up until it outweighs the benefit. Parainfluenza vaccine (a virus) is considered to be extremely effective, however, again, I consider the risk to outweigh the benefit for the whole kennel cough complex. I have never given any of these vaccines in the period since November 1985 and have never had a dog get any of them, despite being at shows, classes, dog parks, and living with someone who worked in shelters and had foster dogs at our house who had active kennel cough.

Some dogs do develop pneumonia or other complications from kennel cough. I consider this to be rare, and also a sign that the dog had a pre-existing susceptibility to respiratory problems. However, it's important to realize that the risk, even if rare, does exist, when deciding on a course to follow as regards kennel cough vaccination.

Betty

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 Post Posted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 2:38 pm 
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Thanks for the info. You're definitely right that a dog can be exposed to kennel cough or even get it, without major problems. My little dog Oliver got it after Aggie and just had a cough for a few days. No fever, etc. The rest of our dogs never even had a cough.

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 Post Posted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 2:57 pm 
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As with everything in life, it's all about weighing risks. If you leave your dog at a very public kennel all the time (which probably means you don't need a dog, but anyway...), maybe the bordatella shot is a good idea. But for all of us, I don't really think they are necessary. If our dogs are exposed, it should pass through their systems fairly quickly, just like colds do for us.

Since our dogs are exposed to wildlife, and rabies is deadly, getting the boosters every few years is probably a good idea. But that is going to be a tough call for me. I may start doing the titer levels instead and only get Sadie the shot if they are outside the safe range. Considering the risk of triggering Sadie's aggression or causing joint issues, I'd rather pay for the tests than unnecessary vaccines.

Betty, what do you know about parvo vaccines? I think I read somewhere that the vaccines might not help that much anyway? I know the adult dogs don't need it, a healthy dog can deal with parvo just fine, but it is awful to hear stories about sick pups.

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 Post Posted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 3:03 pm 
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I know that, like most other vaccines, the parvo vaccine isn't always effective. I've heard of several puppies getting parvo even though they'd had the vaccine.

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 Post Posted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 5:09 pm 
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Seems my post was lost in cyberspace...oh well. Not sure if it's worth the time to re-type it.....


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 Post Posted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 6:38 pm 
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Me, I would not vaccinate my dogs for parvo or distemper. That is what I would do. Thats not what everyone can do.

Billy was vaccinated for parvo, he got it anyway. The probable cause was because he was vaccinated the first time when his maternal anti-bodies were still active. His maternal antibodies gobbled up the vaccine germs, which is exactly what they are supposed to do. When they wore off, he had no immunity and got the disease.

Abe was not vaccinated for parvo and got a mild case of it when he was around 7 mo. I took him to the vet, the vet thought that he had something that was going around, but I told him that Abe had been exposed to parvo. Vet checked for parvo and sure enough, thats what Abe had. He received no treatment.

The recommended protocol for parvo by those who do minimal vaccines is to wait until the pup is AT LEAST 8 weeks old. Then give the boosters. Parvo is a puppy disease. The vaccine has been proven to be good for at least 5 years, so you should never get an annual booster after they are grown. Then there are those who check for titers, but that can be more expensive than most of us would ever go for.

Parvo is a virus that causes diarrhea. If a pup has diarrhea, it should be closely monitored. The stool will have a bad odor, more than bad!!! What kills with parvo is not the disease, but the diarrhea dehydrates the pup, thus killing it. If treatment is soon enough, the disease is not fatal.

The parvo virus lives in the ground, can be carried on the soles of shoes, dropped thru bird droppings and is easily transmitted many ways. The place that most pups get parvo is at the vets office. Just like us when we go to the clinic, we stand a big chance of getting sick, same goes for dogs.

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I know the adult dogs don't need it, a healthy dog can deal with parvo just fine, but it is awful to hear stories about sick pups.


Julie, that is exactly what bigPharma wants everyone to feel. Just say that a pup might die from something and people will run for the vaccine to prevent it!!!!

Betty

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 Post Posted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 8:19 pm 
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Julie N wrote:
As with everything in life, it's all about weighing risks. If you leave your dog at a very public kennel all the time (which probably means you don't need a dog, but anyway...), maybe the bordatella shot is a good idea. But for all of us, I don't really think they are necessary. If our dogs are exposed, it should pass through their systems fairly quickly, just like colds do for us.


I know up here, 100% of the kennels require a bordatella and rabies vaccine to be up to date in order to kennel. We push out as long as possible. Most kennels want a bordatella booster EVERY 6 MONTHS! ~X( I don't get it. When we have had to board Ruby, we kind of "forgot" to get her Kennel cough booster and they let her stay anyway. I had to talk for a bit in order to convince them, but even my vet agrees that it is not good for a dog. She even mentioned that if she wouldn't lose her license for falsifying records that she would've just printed it out that Ruby was all set. The vet we take Ruby to is great although the others in her practice are all about medicating first and finding out what is wrong second.


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