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 Post subject: OFA and hip dysplasia
 Post Posted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 11:48 am 
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After reading a few stories on another site about a line of Catahoulas that developed hip dysplasia, I decided to look at the OFA again. There are currently two Lacys in the OFA database. One is listed as a "Blue Lacy" with Good hips and Normal elbows obtained at over 2 years of age. The other is an "American Blue Lacy" who was tested at 16 months, which means she received a preliminary rather than a definitive result, and she received a Fair.

In breeds that are actively trying to eliminate or prevent hip dysplasia, it is recommend only breed Excellent and Good dogs be bred. And of course you aren't supposed to breed any dog until they are 2 years old and can have full hips done. So the data is problematic for the individual dog who received a Fair. But it raises a much bigger issue that we may want to start looking at as a breed.

Do we need to take a closer look at OFA or PennHip and get some data on this? Two dogs isn't enough to draw conclusions from, but that very fact that a Fair dog popped up within the first two ever tested should make us think. I'm actually considering having Sadie done if I can save up the money purely to give us more data. Is anyone else interested in looking in to this? Any thoughts on health testing in general?

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True Blue Lacys: http://www.truebluelacys.com
More Lacy Pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/julieanna/sets/72157605027566732/


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 Post Posted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 1:40 pm 
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The more science we use the better in my book. Hopefully that one Lacy was an anomaly, but the only way of determining that is with more data points. Are most vets able to do the assessment? How much does it generally run? I'm really ignorant on this topic.

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 Post Posted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 6:28 pm 
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I dont know much about hip dysplasia either. From what I 'think' I dont think that any of my dogs have it. Lucy just couldnt have it. If she is not cold, she is laying with her hind legs out behind her with the legs below the knee in various positions. Abe is pretty much the same way. Larry lays that way a bunch, but not nearly as much as Lucy.

OFA cerification would be something that I would sure do in certain breeds. And, for people who want and have the money to do it, I would like to see it done. It would be a selling point to me now, if I was in the market for a pup, but dont see many lacy breeders doing it. People who are selling their dogs to working homes dont want to spend a lot of money on a dog. The cost of the OFA would be passed on to the buyer, so I just dont see it happening much. I hate to see OFA being done just as a marketing ploy.

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 Post Posted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 4:40 pm 
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I was talked out of doing both PennHip and OFA by my breeder and her daughter in law who happens to be well-known on the other lacy website. They said the parents could run and stuff. I eventually neutered my male at 4 years of age and he's been hit by a car and had his front leg broke so not sure if I could get anything done. I know that PennHip is supposedly capable of diagnosing a pup much earlier than the 2 year old limit that OFA has.


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 Post Posted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 8:49 pm 
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According tot the OFA website a "fair" rating is not necessarily recipe for disaster. "A dog with fair hips but with a strong hip background and over 75% of its brothers and sisters being normal is a good breeding prospect. A dog with excellent hips, but with a weak family background and less than 75% of its brothers and sisters being normal is a poor breeding prospect."

Have there been any reported or documented cases of lacies with joint problems?

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 Post Posted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 6:45 pm 
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That's why I think we may want to start thinking about hip testing. Because no one knows if the siblings have excellent hips or poor hips or something in between since none have been tested. So right now the only thing that can be judged is individual dogs, no history exists.

What Ted described is pretty typical, many breeders in many breeds say they don't need to test because their dogs don't have problems. Which is exactly why dysplasia sneaks up and runs rampant. Here's the explanation on why from WorkingDogs.com:

"Hip dysplasia is a legacy disease, passed through the genes. Chances are that a loose-hipped dog that mates with another loose-hipped dog will give birth to a dysplastic puppy. It would seem, then, that the solution would be simple: to reduce the incidence of the disease markedly, refrain from breeding two dysplastic dogs. But the difficulty in preventing, as well as treating, hip dysplasia is that not all dogs with hip dysplasia will show signs of the disease. Thus, many seemingly normal dogs are bred together, keeping hip dysplasia within in the gene pool."

I don't know if dyplasia has shown up in Lacys yet. If it has, I bet it's been unreported or undiagnosed. But I know that the Cat people are pretty vigilant about it, not because it's an extensive problem but because it would be so devastating to a working breed if it did get bred in. That is really what I'm concerned about, what happens when it shows up and we realize we could have done something to prevent it?

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"You must be a very small minority no matter who you hang around with. Maybe you should start a magazine, Vegetarian Hog Dogging Monthly, find some like-minded individuals."
- Inspiration for my next project from TBH

True Blue Lacys: http://www.truebluelacys.com
More Lacy Pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/julieanna/sets/72157605027566732/


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 Post Posted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 5:42 pm 
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I'm going to use neo mastiffs as an example. Had a friend who got into breeding them without hip checking. Turns out she had a problem with her pups. Parents had bad hips and some of the pups were born dwarfs. The entire breeding plan had to be scrapped and the dogs all put to sleep because the dogs were 150-200 lbs and the breeder couldn't always help them get up on their own. She then found out that hip problems is a real rampant problem within the breed. Something like 75% to 90% of neos have bad hips.


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