Register    Login    Forum    Search    FAQ

Board index » Dr. Dog » Veterinary Discussion




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: ivermectin
 Post Posted: Fri Feb 18, 2011 6:00 pm 
Offline
NLDA Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 27, 2008 4:46 pm
Posts: 4640
Over the years, I have gotten into discussions about giving Ivermectin to dogs. Last night, my son, Donny, had an experience with his dog Royal. Royal is a mutt that came up to their house and they took her in. Royal looks to be a mix with Boston Terrrier and maybe some other bull dog, but I guess that it could be anything. Basically, she looks like a larger Boston Terrier.

Royal had a terrible case of mites. We tried treating it with several natural treatments, but it proved to be so difficult bathing her so often and treating her daily with little benefit, I told the to take her to the vet. The vet told Annie to go to the feed store and get the paste Ivermectin that is for horses.(not the right name, but whatever the paste is called) That was last April. The mites flared up again and so my kids went and got some more paste and started giving it to Royal again. After just a couple of doses, Royal started running into things, her eyes were bulging and dilated and she was really disorientated. They had to take her to the emergency vet clinic and nearly $500 later, Royals sight is coming back and she is doing better. They recognized it as Ivermectin toxicity and treated her for it. The put her on IV's and charcoal. They seem to think that she will get her vision back, but it will take a while.

It is well know that Ivermectin shouldnt be given to collies and that type of dogs because a genetic link to toxicity to Ivermectin. Now, they are finding other dogs are having problems with it. Even a young mule had a reaction like Royals to Ivermectin.

I am posting the info from PetMD that we found.

Parasite Drug (Ivermectin) Poisoning in Dogs
Ivermectin Toxicity in Dogs



This toxic reaction occurs especially in dogs that are genetically hypersensitive to ivermectin, an anti-parasite medication most commonly used for heartworm prevention, or to treat ear and hair mites, which can lead to mange. Ivermectin prevents or kills parasites by causing neurological damage to the parasite, resulting in paralysis and death for the parasite. But dogs genetically sensitive to the medication have an anomaly that allows the ivermectin to pass the dog's blood-brain barrier and into its central nervous system, which can be lethal for the animal.



While the sensitivity to this type of medication is not always guaranteed, the following breeds are most likely to be affected:



* Old English Sheepdog
* English Sheepdog
* Shetland Sheepdog (Sheltie)
* Australian Shepherd
* German Shepherd
* Long-haired Whippet
* Silken Windhound
* Skye Terrier
* Collie



It is also seen in mixed-breed dogs, older dogs that have experienced a blow to the head, puppies, and dogs that have overdosed on similar types of drugs. Treating dogs that are susceptible to ivermectin toxicity with parasitic medication should be only be done under a veterinarian's supervision and with great caution.


Symptoms



Symptoms for the dog may be acute or mild. Acute signs will become apparent within 4 to 12 hours of the drug's administration. In mild cases, symptoms will occur between 48 to 96 hours after your dog has been treated. Such symptoms include:



* Lethargy
* Depression
* Drooling
* Vomiting
* Dilation of the pupil
* Loss of appetite (anorexia)
* Difficulty controlling voluntary movement
* Disorientation
* Tremors/Seizures
* Inability to stand
* Blindness
* Slow heartbeat
* Respiratory distress
* Coma



Treatment



Unfortunately, ivermectin toxicity cannot be reversed. Therefore, it is best to make your pet comfortable and treat the symptoms to the best of your ability. If exposure has occurred within the past four to six hours, induce vomiting and/or administer activated charcoal for the purposes of minimizing absorption. Be on the lookout for signs of secondary complications.



Some or all of the following measures may also be recommended by your veterinarian:



* Intravenous fluid therapy
* Keeping electrolytes in balance
* Intravenous nutritional support
* Turn the dog over frequently
* Appropriate bedding
* Physical therapy
* Ocular lubricants
* Ventilator in case of respiratory distress
* Heat support if body temperature is low
* Fans if body temperature is high
* If your dog can not stand up, urinary catheters may be needed
* Medication for seizures if appropriate



Much will depend on the severity of the dog's reaction, along with its initial overall health. It may take several weeks of dedicated care before the dog fully recovers.


Prevention



There is a test available to check sensitivity to ivermectin. If your dog is one of the breeds that is prone to ivermectin toxicity, you might consider testing for it. If you decide not to have the testing done, be cautious about using ivermectin to prevent heartworm disease or for the treatment of mites.


_________________
Betty

"You did then what you knew how to do, and when you knew better, you did
better."
Maya Angelou

"You have enemies? Good, that means you stood up for something in your life!"
Winston Churchill

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bjleek/


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: ivermectin
 Post Posted: Fri Feb 18, 2011 6:01 pm 
Offline
NLDA Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 27, 2008 4:46 pm
Posts: 4640
Here is the article about the mule:
ACUTE BLINDNESS DUE TO SUSPECTED IVERMECTIN TOXICOSIS IN A FOAL
A lot of potential clinical signs can be expected in ivermectin toxicosis, varying from ataxia, depression, salivation to coma or even death in severe cases. This case is interesting but unusual: acute blindness in a very young foal. The good news: It recovered completely...
A 9-week-old miniature mule foal presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital for acute blindness, ataxia, and depression following an overdose of an over-the-counter ivermectin-based de-worming medication.

Ophthalmic examination and electrodiagnostic evaluation eliminated outer retinal abnormalities as the primary cause of the bilateral blindness, implicating instead a central neurologic effect of the drug.

With symptomatic and supportive care, the foal recovered fully and regained its vision.



Source: Plummer, Caryn E., Kallberg, Maria E., Ollivier, Franck J., Brooks, Dennis E. & Gelatt, Kirk N. (2006): Suspected ivermectin toxicosis in a miniature mule foal causing blindness. In: Veterinary Ophthalmology 9 (1), 29-32.


Betty

_________________
Betty

"You did then what you knew how to do, and when you knew better, you did
better."
Maya Angelou

"You have enemies? Good, that means you stood up for something in your life!"
Winston Churchill

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bjleek/


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: ivermectin
 Post Posted: Tue Mar 01, 2011 4:48 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 27, 2008 9:20 am
Posts: 1186
Location: San Antonio
We use Safe Guard. I have used it for years and it is not only good for the horses but the dogs. I don't worm that often. I also DE all the time, all over the pens and in the food etc... I even fed the cats the other night and mixed it in their food. They look less swollen from parasites than before and I had been using kitty wormer. I highly recommend DE tho.

_________________
Alex & Shannon


Top 
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 

Board index » Dr. Dog » Veterinary Discussion


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

 
 

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron